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are the numbers to use if you are a student or a graduate. -- you are a parent, - use for educators and administrators, the number is -- please make sure you meet thae - mute the tv when you call in. hasg tag, @cspan. our facebook poll has been up for a number of hours. you can go to facebook.com/c- span. is college worth going into debt? let's go to new york and hear from marian wang. she is the education reporter for propublica joining us byvia skype. >> thank you for having me. >> what got you interested in the area of student debt? >> there are record numbers for student debt. i began covering education. i got sucked into it. so much is happening in that space. there are hard economic times that is putting an extra crunch on students and families at a time and college costs keep rising. >> we showed audiences the -- the conversation you participated in a couple of months ago. the scope of the issue and the size of the student debt that we are dealing with these days. >> the government issued more than a hundred billion dollars in student loans to families and grad students and p
because educated women refused to allow they're sons to fight in theal bonn. you have a less educated mother here. single parent in the difficult system. the higher education a women has the more likely her son is to go on with education rather than getting into violence and drugs and certainly she won't condone her son getting into a gang or drugs. i've sometimes been criticized for that because they say all the 911 hijackers were educated and had university degrees and that certainly is true. but nobody botherd to check they're mothers and nearly all of them were i late rate an illiterate. exciting news and then i have to unfortunately talk to you about negative news. i've been in perhaps 120 cities over the past 14 months talking to maybe 50,000 people and i ask this question most places i go and i'll ask you today. how many of you are aware of the fact in afghanistan today, there's 5 point 2 million children going to school and 1 point 8 million of those are female and in 2000 there was only 8 hundred 6,000 kids in school. how many of you know that fact? one, two, you? s
is an commendation of "the world as it could be," human rights education program on the occasion of the 2012 international human rights day. offered by commissioners murase and mendoza. >> is there a motion? >> so moved. >> second. >> reading of the resolution by commissioner murase or mendoza. >> whereas san francisco became the birth place of the united nations with the signing of the u.n. charter at the war memorial veterans building in 1945 and annually december 10th marks international human rights day to celebrate the universal declaration of human rights, the first achievement. united nations. and whereas the san francisco-based foundation founded by the legendary rock band the grateful dead has advanced education about the universal declaration of human rights among youth and adults called the world it's could be." and whereas by delivering human rights curriculum to the creative arts the groundbreaking curriculum is designed to engage youth, inspire learning and critical thinking and positive social interaction, encourage youth who are often marginalized due to learning or phys
would like to present two certificates to you. on behalf of the board of education and the san francisco unified school district. [applause] >> i talked to ester this morning, and i promise i will not take too long. but i will first share my time with two of my outstanding staff members. mrs. jeanna chow and mr. taylor. >> hi, i am jena chou, and i am a kindergarten teacher. i would like to share a few quick reflections. i remember when alice fong yu didn't have enough student and we had to sell the program. and now we don't have to sell the program, in fact we are all sold out. i remember when students went to chinatown to practice the skills and the culture. and now students travel to china to speak the language and live the culture. and none of this it would be without liana szeto. i remember her tireless way to be sure of this success. and determined and still has tireless energy and still have the vision. only now she needs to see it in a slightly larger font. i am -- [laughter] i was going to take that out, but my staff said to keep it in. i am so honored to be a part of alice fong
professional educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their s
another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is educatio
of education presented basically has the definition of bullying in every single state and also a list of i think 37 components and ranks that show you state by state which ones include those components of it. as we heard earlier the federal department is close to approving a federal definition of bullying, so i do believe there is a lot of work in this area. i also think there is a lot of work going on in terms of evidence based practices in terms of interventions that is very exciting. some of the information that we know is that about 80% of the bullying that goes on can pretty much be handled by some very prescribed ways of dealing with things. 20% requires really very targeted social emotional behavioral approach and i think that as we get better at that knowing what methods work with which kids we're going to come a long ways in terms of the interventions and then being successful with those. >> thank you. >> a lot of folks talked about the culture of a school and improving the culture of a school. when i was doing background research on bullying one thing that came to mind was so
always do, especially after being solely instructed by hydra as our education advisor to present the proclamation declaring the month of oct filipino-american month in san francisco. come on up here. get up here, so everybody can take a picture here. if i may, i just wanted to say something as well. you know, there are many streets of our great, great city and everybody i think is now enjoying so many of the neighborhoods that are rising up. but there have been neighborhoods like desoma and the excelsior, critical names of streets that we named after filipinos who really served our city and country in a fabulous way. i want to make sure that people remember that. because it's part of our history. so let me say some of them that many of you in the room know, but a lot of our people don't know that. you ever see the names? (listing names ) if you were really smart and if you are as smart as hydra wants everybody to be in san francisco, because of her board of education work, you should know victoria manalo dreys park. that was named after vicky dreyes, a filipino olympian from san
thrive. and our educators can teach. we are fortunate to have trained professionals on our campuses. including social workers and nurses and wellness services. and ladies and gentlemen, if not for the largess of the san francisco voting community, we would not be able to do this. we want to thank you for the voting of our schools. when you go to the ballot box and vote for the parcel tax and bonds, this is what you vote for. the systems that keep people safe. and we want to thank you. and we have wellness centers and as you know it takes a village. we will stand with those in our community and across the great state of california. to ensure that students have safe places to learn and thrive and adults have great place to work. as you know i had the honor last friday to serve as the master of ceremonies of our board commissioners, and it was great to see family and friends and supporters to come out to support our board of seeducatio. we look forward to have a productive year for with all of you. and i want to thank ester costo with the work she did organizing. and the principal, jul
's- ways to fight tear riz m with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a tribal council. i went to manhattan in the fall of 2005 and the big boss of the whole group, nancy shepherd and carlin coburn in publicity. we met in a little room and i stated my case and they said, this is your first book so you need to listen to a few things here. first of all only 12 percent of nonfiction books make a profit and 2/3 are pre chosen by the publisher. we'd like to put our marketing arm behind us but your having to fight tear riz m to this. since i grew up in africa and worked pakistan for many years you never settle a deal without driving a hard bargain so i said if the hard cover doesn't do well, i'd like the subtitle changed later on for the paper back. julia and our other board relently pounded away month after month. i was in pakistan of december of 2006 and there was a new editor on the book and they said they decided to c
year from elsewhere to kick their education here and who may want to stay here and have jobs here, we should make that easier for them. it is a big debate around a lot of issues. we look forward to working with the administration and congress on that. >> the states have had different reactions to health care reform. some are in the process of forming their own insurance exchanges. other states are leaving it up to the federal government. he proudly each have different perspectives on it. is health reform going to work in 2014 given the responses on the state level to it? >> i know we each address it. i will start. devastates are taking a different approach. one has to do -- different states are taking a different approach. in delaware, we decided to to a state federal partnership after a significant concentration -- consultation. number two, the issue was do we expand medicaid. this was an issue of math. we believe it is a good lesson for us to make sure more people covered through this expansion while at the same time, the federal reimbursement for medicaid increases. number three, t
, on this board, all educators, parents, security, secretaries, whoever they may be, who are in charge of our children when they are not in our care, and they are at the school site that we have the utmost compassion and respect for our children. so i just wanted to say thank you because all of you know on this board know how many times that have i come forward and asked for help, but what i have gotten in return is removal. i would like for you to reach out to me, because i know what works in the bayview and in the southeast. i know the families and the communities in the bayview. i know the church leaders in the bayview and in the southeast sector of the city. i know that we need to close the achievement gap of the targeted population, which is the african-american, the latinos, the polynesians, and our chinese-american children, because we are having all of these problems at our school sites our chinese-american children have come to me and told me that they will not do well in the c s.a.t. and they are struggling and that should not be. thank you for allowing me this time president yee,
academy is igniting a controversial online education revolution, thanks to one man, youtube channel, and tens of millions of students around the world. >>> and the power of 20. a record 20 female senators are sworn in today and they tell diane sawyer how they're planning to make history in an abc exclusive. >>> from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden, and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," january 3rd, 2013. >>> good evening. i'm bill weir. and it is the dream of countless american families. a knock on the door from a big-time college football scout and a spot on a team that fills coliseums on saturday. but tonight comes a revelation from a former star about the pain and pressure that exists inside the nation's football factories and the injectable risks some young men take in order to stay on the field. abc news's chief investigative correspondent brian ross brings us this "nightline investigates." >> reporter: game day at usc in los angeles. part of the huge college sports industry. with lucrative tv contracts, millionaire coaches an
that. as i said later, i'm not very educated in this field. >> reporter: do you think you might be now? >> you educated me. thank you. >> reporter: this seems to be a collective ignorance about the painkillers used in college football. the governing body, the ncaa, told us it does not regulate nor even keep track of the use of toridol and other painkillers on college athletes. >> if we keep track of what happens to horses in horseracing, don't we owe it to the athletes to keep track of what's going on in college sports? >> reporter: of the top 25 college football programs contacted by abc news, 16 of them refused to say whether they use toridol. only four including usc admitted they did. armen armistead says he is now fully recovered, and to prove that to nfl scouts, he played in the canadian football league where his team, toronto, won that country's version of the super bowl, and he was named to the all-star team as a rookie, all done without any toridol, a drug armistead says he would like now to see banned. >> if you can't play through the pain, maybe you should just sit out and re
that the board, the rules committee and the board of education it remains in the process of re-examining all of our policies. on which the rules of board is one section. that's why the format looks change. and not throughout here, and we are still in the process of doing that, and just to reiterate there are sections that we assigned to various committees not the rules committee. and the grounds commission and the curriculum section to the curriculum committee, etc.. and we hope to complete that this year. >> thank you, any other comments from the board? roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. dr. murase. >> aye. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by aye or nay. i declare that the floor is open f
else, the other part of that strategy and that goal is to do a much more serious education marketing campaign. we've got to educate everybody using our streets. so, we're choosing today in the middle of the beginning of our holiday season with everybody's attention on having great fun, having wonderful events, having serious sales that allow people to shop, this is where the consciousness has to be risen. and, so, in light of this, we picked this day and this time and this area of year to make this announcement that we have a pedestrian strategy that's going on, a serious one. we're jointly doing it with the collaboration of all the different departments. we have asked and part of the strategy will be our police department, really doing a lot more enforcement strategically in all the areas that we need to, with not only stops, not only enforcement and ticketing, but a serious effort to remind people that these are going to be spots where we are going to pay a lot more attention. we have the mta, with ed's leadership and his staff, parking and traffic and others, working to do some of
for start-ups. staffing, exactly. so we have that as part of this innovation center. >> access to education and access to the right environment. >> yes, i would say so. >> ibm is a big company. i am sure there are a lot of people in the valley that still see it as an east coast-based company. the reality is you have been here for a long time. can you talk about the ontario culture here and what is being done that with the great ideas -- a entrepreneurial culture here and what is being done with the great ideas? >> we started here in 1962. this building is about 25 years old. we were down the hill at the san jose raiders center. -- research center. one of the things that ibm does -- a couple of things. one is having an eye on where things are going. one of the reasons that we focused here on data, relational database disk drive, was, looking at the time, the inability to access data quickly on a computer was actually an inhibitor to getting business done. one of the ways that you get innovation out there is you understand how it is going to be used, really, before you start. the major reason
telling to your member of congress. >> two other things. on the department of education side think they will work on the mess, and hope we do a better job with the servicers reining in the problems. it is important that they have it is important that they have been hearing about this problem so much. that is one thing that does not require congressional action. another thing is the consumer financial protection bureau is sort of the new game in town as far as this goes. people do not think of them as a federal student loan side, they primarily have jurisdiction over private student loans. there will be quite active, talking about some of the predatory practices, but even on the federal student loan side the consumer financial protection bureau has jurisdiction over debt collectors and some of the servicers. it is not the biggest picture issues we have been talking about so much, but on the ground for people right now who have already borrowed, clients like mine having the existing programs that work well, it is incredibly important. hopefully a lot is going to happen in that area.
shows huge role in education, and i look for someone to have impact on me. she educates with fun, she deserving this award because of her passionate input and i would like mr. tim allen to share this award. >> thank you, and good evening board of education and ladies and gentlemen. it is my honor to be here tonight. i get the opportunity to travel throughout california and make presentations at board meetings. and as you can imagine, some of them are quite interesting. but tonight i have a very good feeling about what is going on in this district. and congratulations to you, and what you have done. just seeing these students and the quality of the work they have learned is a testament to what you are doing in this district. i would like to share with you briefly the history of this award. i think it brings more meaning to what we are doing for teac r teache teachers. the carlson family began a company in the late 70s. and they took 5% of their profits and encouraged their employees to go out and work for not-for-profit in the bay area. and they could come back and ask for grants in s
for children" and we have been around for about 32 years. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message out
board does, sharing high quality courses that are designed and built upon and refined through educators working together. >> i want to separate these four second. i could not agree with you more that brilliant minds helped shape a common core. as opposed to the construction -- >> it was a combination of mathematicians and educators. if you're making turf courses -- >> we have teacher preparation programs across the country. many of them not the kinds of institutions for which people are recruited. we're trying to get these programs to overhaul what they do. i understand the value of trying to share practices. i am curious. are there other ways to help change what is going on? >> let me pause and celebrate your candor in the following sense. this is the time in a time of limited resources to step out. when people ask what more resources to need to implement it worries me as a question in the sense that we have to learn how to redirect and be more efficient and to get an edge of the few things these standards are asking us to do. i am saying you're right. as a system, producing productive
. >> maryland achieves and knee- jerk achievement. education week magazine has named the school -- a major achievement. education week magazine has been the school the best and the nation for the fifth year in a row. >> maryland hangs on to its no. 1 ranking. >> obviously we are delighted maryland has identified as number one by quality council. >> she is in charge of what students are learning across the state, but she says there is enough credit to go around. >> it gives the opportunity to recognize stakeholders across the state to have really worked together to make this the number one school system. >> as you look at this year's results, would you say there is room for improvement? >> the work is not done. certainly the focus on on eliminating the achievement gap. every parent, every educator, every child deserves to have the very best school in his or her community. >> maryland received nothing more than a b grade in a number of academic categories. it landed an a in several categories including work force policies. >> how tough is it to remain no. one year after year? >> we want to m
on what some catholic school systems are doing to try to survive? >> our educational system was imploding. enrollment-wise, finance wise, something radical, radical surgery had to be done. >> announcer: major funding for "religion & ethics news weekly" is dedicated to i founder's interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual group and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. the january henson foundation, and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. arguments continue over the so-called "fiscal cliff" deal approved this week in the fina minutes of the 112th congress. and religious groups are among those weighing in. the family research council criticized the deal for not including spending cuts and entitlement reforms. meanwhile, leaders of the christian group bread for the world said while the measure isn't perfect, they believe it will "prevent major economic damage that would have affected hungry and poo
the notification and education program survey and early notification portions are the sort of the new pieces that aren't required by state law. we are using those outreach efforts, those outreach components to inform who we talk to in the actual statutory opt out phase. we are not suggesting that anyone who is going to be served by cleanpower sf would not receive an opt out notification. anyone who wishes to participate can participate which sounds like opting in, but we won't enroll them after we have included them in an opt out process. so i think we have worked with the city attorney on this to make sure we are accurately understanding our obligation and that our approach is consistent with it. we think it is. and so we're not always this careful with our language as we should be, but the actual steps will be anyone who says "let me in" will receive and be included in the opt out portion of the program. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> can i add also the people who are seen in the green area that are saying "i don't want to be in the program". they too will be included in the pr
as our educators and leaders have been doing. so thank you for the honor. thank you for recognizing us. thank you world savvy and we appreciate and we're honored and thankful. thanks again. >> and just in closing i wanted to give my heartfelt thanks to commissioner mendoza for the commendation, but for the many years of championing the work that world savvy does in the district. thank you. [ applause ] >> okay. thank you commissioner mendoza. our left commendation is in recognition of lowell high school for attending the national blue-ribbon school recipient award. superintendent carranza, would you make the presentation? >> thank you, president yee and we would like to recognize lowell high school as a national blue-ribbon school for 2012. and here this evening is the principal, the remarkable, dynamic, super principal of lowell high school, mr. andy ishibashi. andy would you come forward and accept this certificate of recognition, please? [ applause ] also joining us is the science department chair and the lead author of the report that led to the blue-ribbon designation. so congr
agreement, both will be held on january 22, 2013. discussion of other educational, issues none. and item n, none. item o, we will vote on the calendar for one item that was severed. roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas. >> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> aye. >> item p, consent calendar resolutions, this our audit, 2-c, and our auditor is in the audience. >> i first want to congratulate president norton and vice president fewer, on your new titles. we have with us tonight leonard dana, to give you a short presentation on our 2011-12 audit. the company has done our audits for six or seven years now. and mr. dana has been a partner on this for three years now i think. >> i am on my second go around. >> exactly. >> usually when we present the audit reports, we usually have a lot to talk about. because of the findings. but i went back and looked at prior reports. and i didn't find one that didn't have one comment in them. and some comments if you go back in time, they are more than ticky-tack items, they were fairly serious items. and it sh
to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say someth
the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorr
, education, and leadership. our president is one of the co-chairs of the council. it is my great pleasure to introduce him this evening. he is a scholar, advocate, and a true friend of afghanistan. pls -- [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and your work as vice chair of the u.s. afghan women's council. i wish to thank the members from the delegation from afghanistan, u.s. afghan women's council and all of our guests from around the world for joining us this evening. it is a privilege to welcome back to georgetown the president of afghanistan hamid karzai. we look forward to hearing his remark on afghanistan beyond 2014, a perspective on afghan-u.s. relations. 2014 will be an historic year for afghanistan as it will witness elections across the country and the end of u.s. and isaf combat operations. as president obama, secretary of state clinton and many of this room have emphasized this transition provides us with the opportunity for diplomatic and cultural relations between our peoples. at georgetown, we are proud to be a part of this critical work notably through th
, and higher education. is this a good thing or bad thing? >> i don't think it's something we need to get too alarmed about right now. there are many factors that contribute it to. one hispanics have highest unemployment rate between 110-13 rate where you have seen the decline. but also cultural thing. as more women get educated and more are in the workforce they are not having the eight kids that my grandmother had now women limit to two or three. a combination of the economy, plus the fact that they're getting a higher education has led to this. i wouldn't get alarmed we're growing at very fast rate. just last ten years we've doubled hispanic population by 2050 we're estimated to be at 12 million. i would say we're watching the situation but it's not an alarming rate yet. >> this is really very -- a very american thing if you think about it. >> notice when this decline stronger than we expected earlier than we expected, when it began, coincides almost exactly with the coming of the recession. and emigrants when they first come to this country repeat the pattern of their home countries they
to thank supervisor olague for her leadership as well and call on the hearing on education and as well as housing. those are two issues that affect african-american community across the country as well as san francisco. i'm -- you know what i do for a living. i'm a homeless advocate. i advocate for homeless people and clifford hoosier has been coming to my center for two years now and a immigrant from sierra leon. if he returns to his home he will be killed. he is requesting asylum here in san francisco. he hasn't gotten s he is not here illegal. he's a harvard graduate as well. next year january 31 and i just been coming to city hall to try to get support for him as well, and that's pretty much all i have to sai. i would like him to speak for himself. >> i want to thank the commission for its work. this is my second time appearing at city hall. the first time i had the opportunity again to witness a session like this, and i want to thank everybody. i want to thank supervisor olague. i have read much about the commission work from the examiner, the san francisco examiner.
sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young pe
the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site
in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it victims of gun violence. and before and after this moment of silence we will be active doing the things we need to do to reduce violence in our city. thank you. >> okay, good morning. thank you all for coming out today. we're very happy to be here. my name is ed rifkin, i'm the other ed, director of transportation. and as the transportation director, i oversee the sfmta which is the agency that is charged with implementing the city'
to dozens of schools where there were dramatic gains that were maintained. >> "the education of michelle rhee." fr in ontlise made possie by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. additional funding for this program is provided by: >> michelle rhee's journey to national prominence began in 2007. washington dc had just inaugurated a new mayor, adrian fenty. he had won a landslide election and promised to fix the district's abysmal school system. >> the lack of real opportunity for young people drives our unemployment rate, it drives our crime rate, and we can't have that. this is the nation's
on the san francisco public utilities commission and for the education plans for the choice aggregation and cleanpower sf program. >> okay. very good. colleagues it's a really as president torres as said it's a momentous occasion, historic occasion we had. we improved our relationship with shell and the allocation for the cleanpower sf and we're looking how the power can be maximized in the next year as we in fact the process of enrollment. i've actually believe that the timing of this could not be anymore -- anymore important to do today because of our global climate change that is happening, and i believe that we're seeing -- actually on the way here today i was listening to the radio. there was a report on democracy now that a portion of our artic ice about the size of the united states of america had melted this year which is significant to really alter what the temperature of the ocean is and we're seeing what really the impact of -- every year we're seeing dramatic examples of climate change and hurricane sandy being one of them. we're also seeing around the world real demogr
. issues i care about, really care about. education has always been very center to the things i have been involved with. i am a former teacher also. i work in the early childhood education field for 18 years running an organization. those are parts of my dna. other things that people are not aware of, i do care about health environment in san francisco. i want to make sure that we have enough health facilities to serve all san francisco, not just one part of the city. i want to make sure that our small businesses are supported. why? i come from a family where we had a small grocery store. i understand what it means to run a small business. maybe people think about 500 people is a small business. i'm talking about businesses that drive neighborhoods, support neighborhoods, give jobs to people in those neighborhoods. i want to work with others on the board of supervisors to improve the conditions support them , and make them thrive. those are some of the things, education, the economy. now that we are through the downturn, and dealt with the cuts, we want to make sure that is we impr
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